download Audiobooks Los desafortunados – Bilb-weil.de

Un reportero deportivo visita la ciudad de Nottingham para cubrir un partido de f tbol, y es all donde le abordan los recuerdos y los pensamientos sobre la muerte de su mejor amigo, Terry TillinghastLa estructura de esta novela es una met fora del funcionamiento de nuestra mente, la aleatoriedad de sus cap tulos compite con el desorden de nuestras ideasLa obra nos hace meditar, no s lo acerca de nuestra muerte, sino tambi n acerca de nuestra propia existenciaLos pliegos sueltos dentro de la caja son el reflejo mismo de la fragilidad de la vida


10 thoughts on “Los desafortunados

  1. s.penkevich s.penkevich says:

    How can I place his order, his disintegrationThrough fragments of a randomized collection of memories called up while wandering through a city, the reader explores the life, loves and losses of the narrator As such a premise would remind many of Ulysses and Joyce s incredible use of the stream of consciousness, B.S Johnson 1933 1973 manages to create something unique and inventive with The Unfortunates His story is separated into 27 packets which are intended to be read at random aside f How can I place his order, his disintegrationThrough fragments of a randomized collection of memories called up while wandering through a city, the reader explores the life, loves and losses of the narrator As such a premise would remind many of Ulysses and Joyce s incredible use of the stream of consciousness, B.S Johnson 1933 1973 manages to create something unique and inventive with The Unfortunates His story is separated into 27 packets which are intended to be read at random aside from the First and Last chapter, and allows for a creative artificial impression for the act of memory and thought The random approach, which may initially be dismissed as cutesy and gimmicky, manages to go deeper and beyond the gimmick and explore the implied meanings we place upon order In the Hungarian translation of the book, which was published as a regularly bound novel, Johnson included a special introduction urging the reader to still experience the chapters at random, stressing that perhaps the pointof the novel in it s original format the tangible metaphor for the way the mind works By randomly selecting the order, each reader is given an opportunity for a personal experience of the novel The form itself is a larger explanation of form In the context of the story, we experience his memories out of chronological order, much like how we experience our own sets of memories In the context of the form, it examines how order affects our understanding and meaning In my own personal reading, Johnson, the narrator is a potentially fictional version of the actual author, spent much of the present eating and referring to vague moments of him and his desceased friend Tony eating in the city It wasn t until the penultimate packet that I actually experienced the fleshed out memory This gives an impression that this memory was somehow of extreme importance to Johnson, and was possibly suppressed in his mind until he could properly deal with it at the end It is a statement on the way I have been conditioned to approach novels I noticed that the final few packets had a subtle sense of greater intensity as I typically expect the final sections of a novel to be where themes tie together and where the climax of plot should be Had the luck of the draw given an entire different plot point near the end, the food scene would likely have seemed less crucial and the different point would have been garnished with this implied intensity While this is a short book, much of the information is rather repetitive, which allows it to not only to seem to fit together well regardless of order, but positions the reader to different vantage points on memories Depending on which view of an event the reader experiences first Johnson, when in one memory, will refer to events in later or earlier memories and then have another packet pertaining directly to the memory, provides a subtly different meaning to the narrative Sometimes you have forshadowing, sometimes just a simple revisit of an earlier idea Anything means something if you impose meaning on it, which in itself is a meaningless thing, the imposition, writes Johnson He draws are attentions through the form to our impressions and imposed meanings, but also dismisses them all as meaningless Perhaps our explanations on the form don t matter at all, and the random order serves as an elaborate distraction when all he really wants to get across is the workings of the mind How the mind arranges itself, tries to sort things into order, is perturbed if things are not worted, he muses as he sorts threw the mental shoebox of strewn about memories There is plenty of evidence to support that this is the real impression he wants to get across, as the style of writing is rambling with extensive use of commas, breaks to represent a drifting mind, and a constant second guessing and correcting that reminded me of the narrator in Wittgenstein s Mistress I fail to remember, the mind has fuses Rest assured, there is content to the book beyond the form and style, although the story is admittedly secondary While that is the initial draw, be it gimmick or no, there is substance to be had from the story This is a rather tragic book, exploring the themes of death, frailty and futility The death of Tony is the major set of memories Johnson wrestles with, yet in digging up the past for Tony, a whole slew of other painful, and sometimes pleasant, memories are pulled to the surface The death of Tony and the death of Johnson s relationship with his college flame, Wendy, are eternally forged together in the imprints of his memory While they occurred at the same time, it is the betrayal of life for Tony, and the betrayal of Wendy while he constantly references the betrayal , he never clarifies if she actually slept around on him or if it was something else that keep them inseparable It seems these deaths helped to solidify his use of food as an escape as well, Tony s life being eaten out of him by the world and cancer is countered by Johnson taking in life from the world though food The frustrations felt, the sheer futility to stop the cancer left Johnson second guess his life from then on out The sportswriter scene depicts Johnson constantly questioning his choices of words and his own worth as a sportswriter, displaying his feeling of futility to actually be a good, authentic writer He has watched his closest friend disintegrate, his relationships disintegrate, and now he notices all around him peeling paint, chipped banisters, and other aspects of crumbling architecture.While this is a novel about the death of a friend, since Johnson puts the reader into his mind it is really a novel about Johnson We learnabout him than we ever do Tony, and we are only able to know his own impressions on the events In the introduction, Johnathan Coe observes that the majority of interaction with Tony shows them discussing Johnson, his book, his problems with Wendy, etc Perhaps this is the strongest argument that the book is really about our implied impressions, unique to each reader, as the book is the unique impressions of events as seen by one person The difficulty is to understand without generalization, to see each piece of received truth, or generalization, as true only if it is true for me, solipsism again, I come back to it again, and for no other reason In general, generalization is to lie, to tell lies The standard novel is perceived as a generalization of themes, symbols and ideas that all readers can light upon, but this novel insists on doing away with generalizations and entering into a solipsistic viewpoint on life around us, to fully appreciate what one individual feels, to be alone in a sea of perspectives His anger towards Christianity in the book, seeing turning to God only in the final hours as a cop out, is an expression of generalization it is submitting to a general idea of existence and general set of goals, ideals and morals He feels you should face death in your own narrow viewpoints, goals, ideals and morals The terrifying thing is that no matter how we view life though, we still are all barreling towards death and there is nothing anyone can do to stop it, ours and theirs It is difficult to think of these things without terror, the pity is easy to feel, easy to contain, but so useless.As this is often considered a work of post modernism, my opinions and imposed meanings are essentially meaningless Besides, don t take my word for it take Mike s word in his review though , the idea is to form your own perspectives and meanings since that is how we experience life Well, a decent metaphor for it at least If all this is meaningless, and this book is nothing but gimmick, it is still worth investigating Picking packets and random was a fun experience, and the box makes a nice addition to any bookshelf, as well as a great place to store your packets, notes, pens and stash your bookmarks While the book is rather repetitive, it is still a good, quick read, and the structure is exciting What I enjoyed most of all was how he placed you in his lecture halls and all over campus through his memories, places I really love to be It brought back my own memories of sweating through exams, tragically failed college romances, late night debates and laughter amongst classmates over booze or coffee It is impressive as well that this book came out in 1967, yet still hasn t received much attention despite publishers like McSweeny that clamor to deliver quirky structures such as this book That really gives further meaning to Johnson s discussion of old solutions to modern problems So open up Johnson s box.3.75 5


  2. Mike Puma Mike Puma says:

    4.5 stars rounded up.Here it was he talked about the RAF So 10 space gap So must others, for ever, or talk about something like it, and it does not matter to them, now, it cannot have mattered at any time to me, so why this, if it is so meaningless, anything means something only if you impose meaning on it, which in itself is a meaningless thing, the imposition why do reasons matter Sometimes I think I shall become a Surrealist.Another day, another review, hopefully one which will encour 4.5 stars rounded up.Here it was he talked about the RAF So 10 space gap So must others, for ever, or talk about something like it, and it does not matter to them, now, it cannot have mattered at any time to me, so why this, if it is so meaningless, anything means something only if you impose meaning on it, which in itself is a meaningless thing, the imposition why do reasons matter Sometimes I think I shall become a Surrealist.Another day, another review, hopefully one which will encourage the reading of The Unfortunates, even though I m likely to discourage as many as are prodded on As is frequently the case with the books I ve been reading, this isn t one for everyone it could be, but it won t be, as it should be, yes, no, maybe, perhaps.The narrator, one B.S Johnson, travels to a city to cover a soccer match for a newspaper, and the travel, the pre match wandering through the city, the sights, all conspire to remind the narrator of an old friend, now deceased, who had been a good friend and trusted ally in the narrator s budding career as a writer Rather a bland premise, but that story isn t the story The story is the randomness of recollection, the bits and pieces, remembered in detail or remembered in part Embellished Romanticized Contrived Non linear Scatter shot Cumulative while disintegrating Exactly the way Memory works, the memories that matter.Johnson the author employs a style that some may find tortuous Polysyndetons without the conjuctions, memory upon memory Heavily punctuated demanding the reader slow down, slow down Gaps in the text suggesting the narrator s mind has wandered off, on to something else Disclaimers undermine and reinforce So, about that book in a box WTF is that Is it a gimmick Of course Is it a useful gimmick Decidedly Does it add, embellish, contribute, reinforce So many questions The answer, I believe is it does add It reinforces the idea of the randomness of memory It reinforces the idea that no two readers ever read the same book.If you re lucky enough to have a copy at hand, take a moment Prop up the front cover from behind so that the box stands open Consider the topmost surface covered in a muted, off white color of satin with a small pillow resting on it A casket The contents of which holding the objects of Memory The contents to which most Memories are headed A clich , yes No.The joy of this book isn t in the story The joy of this book is in the reading. Have a grand day


  3. Emily Emily says:

    Twenty minutes ago, I had this review in the bag I had taken thorough notes, had arranged them by topic, and had even highlighted passages to quote And then B S Johnson, the author of The Unfortunates, dropped this bomb on me in the second to last paragraph The difficulty is to understand without generalization, to see each piece of received truth, or generalization, as true only if it is true for me, solipsism again, I come back to it again, and for no other reason In general, generalizat Twenty minutes ago, I had this review in the bag I had taken thorough notes, had arranged them by topic, and had even highlighted passages to quote And then B S Johnson, the author of The Unfortunates, dropped this bomb on me in the second to last paragraph The difficulty is to understand without generalization, to see each piece of received truth, or generalization, as true only if it is true for me, solipsism again, I come back to it again, and for no other reason In general, generalization is to lie, to tell lies That really puts a cramp in any attempt at review, since to review is to generalize, don t you think And, hey, isn t Johnson generalizing by saying that generalizations are lies So, give me a second Let me take a few sips of my tea, look over my notes onetime, and take a deep breath Allow me a minute to gather my thoughts and come back to this experimental and provocative text, because my head is beginning to hurt in that way it does after reading post modernism Firstly, there is not enough room on this coffee shop table for the book, my computer, my notes, and the five highlighters it took to organize my thoughts into a rainbowed outline The act of reading this book is incredibly tactile You hold the individual chapters in your hand to read, people passing stare at the thin pamphlets, the man next to me looks up every time I put one section to the left and pick up the next on the right It s an attention grabber with its box cover, its 1 12 page sections, and its gift like presentation I opened it for the first time and felt the need to take pictures of it like I did ten years ago when I got my first iPod This book is beautiful It consists of twenty seven chapters that are separately bound The first and last are marked and in place at the top and bottom of the pile of chapters, but the remaining twenty five arrive in random order In his note to the reader, Johnson encourages him to choose read the chapters in the order in which they arrive or rearrange them before beginning When I began reading I was sitting across from The Canadian in a bookstore She was struggling with formatting her novel, and I was struggling with a novel that defied formatting How do you think I should read it I asked What She looked up She looked frantic and frustrated The sections Do you think I should read them as they came to me, or do you think I should mix them up Oh She rested her chin in her hand and seemed for the first time in hours to be distracted from her task I would read it in the order I received it Why Because I would like to think that I received the book in the order I was supposed to read it This is why I love her.In the first chapter Johnson arrives in Nottingham to report on a football game He thinks he is traveling to a town that he has never been to before but, setting food on solid ground, is aware that he has spent a good deal of time in this town In fact, he spent most of that time with his friend and colleague, Tony, who died some time ago from cancer And so begin the twenty five randomly arranged chapters that alternate between the present and the past, between Johnson s day in Nottingham and his memories of Tony I should mention here that the novel is entirely autobiographical Johnson was very vocal in his belief that fiction should be true Any novel that wasn t absolutely true, in his opinion, was a lie, and truth could not be conveyed with lies How can you convey truth in a vehicle of fiction he asked The two terms, truth and fiction, are opposites, and it must logically be impossible Of course many if not most literary critics and creatives would disagree and argue that truth is too subtle to be achieved through the use of literal language and historical details I think Tim O Brien said it best A thing may happen and be a total lie another thing may not happen and be truer than the truth In the end, Johnson s insistence on absolute truth proved to be too restrictive Johnson s theory, in effect a breathtaking insistence that all literature should reduce itself to the status of glorified memoir, eventually proved too much of a straightjacket by the time of his last, posthumously published novel, See The Old Lady Decently, he was reaching further and further back into his family history, and the result has an air of strain and imprecision, weariness even from the introduction by Jonathan Coe In the end I appreciated the order in which I received the book Somewhat divinely, my arrangement of chapters ended with the final exchange between Tony and Johnson the last thing I said to him, all I had to give him, alone with him, with my coat on, about to go, the car waiting outside to run us to the station, staring down at him, facing those eyes, he staring back all the time now, it must have been a great effort for him, yes, and I said, it was all I had, what else could I do, I said, I ll get it all down, mate It ll be very little, he said, after a while, slowly, still those eyes That s all anyone has done, very little, I said So how does one review a book that makes the argument that it is the sole truth of its author and therefore cannot be questioned, criticized, or challenged Should I play into Johnson s philosophy or push against it If you ll allow me, I think I ll do both.The book, while literally about death, loss, and creativity, concerns itself predominantly with the accidental and persistent nature of memory If the writing style suggests it the run on sentences, the spaces on the page where the speaker s thought process is interrupted, and the lines that end mid sentence , then the form enforces it You can t help but read it randomly, the memories coming without provocation, occurring as arbitrarily as the order in which you receive the book I should be honest I had ulterior motives for this review after having read very little of the book I wanted this review to be a discussion about truth and memory selfishly they re my favorite literary themes aside, of course, from sex I wanted this review to hotly contest Johnson s perception of memory with a slew of quotes from van der Kolk and Freud I wanted this review to be a literary smack down After taking a class on narratives derived from traumatic memory, I felt my chest puff out and my know it all ness preparing to reject Johnson s version of how memory is experienced After having only read the introduction, I found myself shouting angrily at the text, But memory isn t random It is triggered by something in the present, a smell, a taste, a lost memento rediscovered in the attic Like Proust considering a tea soaked madeleine, memory occurs when something in the present triggers something in the past It is not random It is not accidental.But then I remembered something I remembered the night last summer that I spent with The Poet and the fragmented words I wrote the morning after I drove back to Bread Loaf after leaving him on the side of Route 7 and sat in my twin bed trying desperately to get everything down that I could remember Maybe, I thought, if I could remember everything from the night before, I could make sense of what had happened I would know why he kissed me in the middle of the lake, and why he fed me bites of his breakfast sandwich, and why exactly he had begun to pull away on the couch as we listened to the sound of Lake Champlain moving like a tongue against the rocks Isn t this what we feel, fundamentally, when we write We write to make sense of the world We use the imprecise art of words to describe what cannot otherwise be described What I wrote in my bed that day was entirely accidental The memories came to me randomly They repeated themselves They were out of order Remembering the silence that fell over us at the register while we paid for our lunch a sandwich that we split was interrupted by remembering how he had sat facing me on the bed in the morning and rubbed his big toe against mine as if to comfort me with as little contact as possible In that moment of remembering my own remembering, my pretense dropped My know it all ness turned to the humble concession that what has been written and theorized about memory is not necessarily true for everyone Maybe most memory is triggered by the present, but in the horrible aftermath of his friend s death, Johnson strove to memorialize his friend and to convey the process of his own remembering The danger of generalization that Johnson warns against in his last lines then is that it leaves no room for the unique bordering on solipsistic and enigmatic qualities of human experience Just now something wonderful happened As I was holding the chapters loosely in my hand, trying to leaf through the pages to find the last line of a section I loved, the entire text fell onto the floor The first chapter slid across the granite tile Four others flipped upside down A thin chunk of chapters stayed together, but the rest turned backwards and spun out of the order in which I had read them As I bent down to gather them up I realized that the book, both palpably and intellectually, resists analysis This difficulty in criticizing a work that is actively negating and deflecting criticism, it seems, is exactly what Johnson wanted


  4. Rita Rita says:

    Yesterday I had a privilege few have I had this book read to me, all around Nottingham, as close to the venues described in the book as possible 27 people in character as Bryan were reading different chapters in different places The feeling of having to track them down following a map and go inside pubs, cafes, the City Council, Broadway cinema, a private house, a parked car, a hotel, etc., they all added to the story making this an incredible experience Thank you to Excavate and their commu Yesterday I had a privilege few have I had this book read to me, all around Nottingham, as close to the venues described in the book as possible 27 people in character as Bryan were reading different chapters in different places The feeling of having to track them down following a map and go inside pubs, cafes, the City Council, Broadway cinema, a private house, a parked car, a hotel, etc., they all added to the story making this an incredible experience Thank you to Excavate and their community theatre group for their amazing effort and for proving that storytelling is for adults as well


  5. Doug Doug says:

    Although the edition I got from the library came bound in a single volume, I was able to cleverly skip around the chapters as intended, which did increase the fun quotient, if not making much difference in how one experiences the work Aside from just the avant garde nature of his novels, I really enjoy Johnson s use of language, and this makes me want to investigate those of his works I haven t yet read.


  6. Andrew Andrew says:

    I m a sucker for gimmicky books, so when I saw this book in a box no one had to twist my arm to get me to purchase it, and I m glad I did Unlike some of the other gimmicky books I ve read House of Leaves, The Raw Shark Texts , you don t get the impression that B.S Johnson was patting himself on the back for being clever as he wrote this If the introduction is to be believed, he actually probably was patting himself on the back as he wrote it, but you wouldn t know it to read it The chapte I m a sucker for gimmicky books, so when I saw this book in a box no one had to twist my arm to get me to purchase it, and I m glad I did Unlike some of the other gimmicky books I ve read House of Leaves, The Raw Shark Texts , you don t get the impression that B.S Johnson was patting himself on the back for being clever as he wrote this If the introduction is to be believed, he actually probably was patting himself on the back as he wrote it, but you wouldn t know it to read it The chapters of the book are unbound, and meant to be shuffled and with the exception of the first and last chapters read in a random order, in an attempt to translate the non linear nature of memories into a written format It sounds gimmicky, and it is, but it s a gimmick that works really well, especially given the stream of conciousness writing style and the nature of the story, which is a collection of B.S Johnson s memories of a friend of his who had died of cancer Not a terribly uplifting subject, obviously, but it s handled with aplomb it s sad, but not in a maudlin fashion This is easily one of the best books I ve read this year, second only to If on a winter s night a traveller


  7. Marc Nash Marc Nash says:

    A book that comes in a book shaped box Twenty seven sections, one labelled first , one last and the reader is free to choose the order in which they read the interceding 25 sections This isn t a device for the sake of being tricksy, but the author wants to replicate the random and unreliable nature that our memories work.A writer and journalist is sent to cover a soccer match in a Midlands town As he steps off the train two hours ahead of kick off, a host of memories rush into his head as A book that comes in a book shaped box Twenty seven sections, one labelled first , one last and the reader is free to choose the order in which they read the interceding 25 sections This isn t a device for the sake of being tricksy, but the author wants to replicate the random and unreliable nature that our memories work.A writer and journalist is sent to cover a soccer match in a Midlands town As he steps off the train two hours ahead of kick off, a host of memories rush into his head as this is a town chockfull of resonance for him He met one of his best friends who was at University here when he had travelled up for a collaboration on student newspapers His friend died of cancer at just 29 and the book is a series of chopped up recollections of the triangular friendship together with the man s wife, the narrator s own love life, the disease and the nature of writing itself.As he makes his meandering progress to the football stadium, via caf , butchers and pub, he recalls time spent with his friends in various towns Sometimes the architecture eludes him as he can t pinpoint which pub or caf , or sometimes the architecture itself has changed with progress Equally he struggles to pinpoint whether the man s wife, or whichever of his own female consorts was present in some recollected event or not As much as memory floods in on an emotional level, in its caprice some of the details are denied him and they of course can inflect his emotional response to the memory It s interesting that one section is him finally sat in the press box, desultorily composing his report as the match proceeds, limited by both the clich d language of sports reporting which he d like to burst out from, plus the word limit of his column inches which pretty much predetermines what he can write even before the match kicks off and play takes what direction it will On the inside of the box his final match report is printed, and reads very bland and lacking all the linguistic flourishes demonstrated throughout the rest of the book.There were a couple of places where I didn t feel the narrative conceit was consistent It was fortunate that the penultimate section I read happened to be him in the press box of the ground What would have happened if I d happened to read that after the first chapter , the timing would have been way off This did happen when an early section I read had him on the final part of his walk up to the ground, when later I read sections where he stopped off to buy some meat at a butchers Just seemed to me that the author could have got around these timing problems easily enough but just hadn t noticed or tried.And what of the overall effect of the narrative conceit My path through is in all likelihood going to be different from any other reader, since their section choices will be different from mine I think it worked well for both the horrendous rise and fall of hope as the path of the friend s cancer is traced and also that of memory s fragmentedness too As Johnson has his protagonist comment, yes how the mind arranges itself, tries to sort for things into orders, is perturbed if things are not sorted, are not in the right order, nags away This is by far the most interesting parts of the narrative as he struggles over whether it was his first visit to their house, or whether he drove as his friend had not yet passed his driving test, whether that was the occasion when he d bought a certain book on architecture and so on And then in the light of his friend s premature death, does any of it matter anyway My mind passes dully over the familiar ground of my prejudices, so much of thought is repetition, is dullness, is sameness Definitely an interesting read, if not a gripping one, since the subject matter is both mundane in the sense of what is being recalled and grim in respect of the disease If you re interested in literary experimentation, or trying to get to grips with arealistic mimesis of how the human mind works, I d say read this novel if however you are after an entertaining read for entertainment s sakes, then possibly not It certainly sparked my creative imagination and helped me resolve a project of my own that had become stalled The idea of a reader navigating their own path through a narrative and not a quest or treasure finding one is deliciously enticing


  8. Mike Ingram Mike Ingram says:

    If you live with a significant other, or a roommate, or a parent or sibling or aunt or summer boarder, you could read this book in partnership, each of you taking one of the short sections, reading it, then sorting it into its appropriate pile I ve Read But He Hasn t, He s Read But I Haven t, We ve Both Read, Neither Of Us Has Read This might be a fun game, and a unique kind of bonding experience.Unfortunately, since I live alone, having a book in a box, the sections of which can be read in w If you live with a significant other, or a roommate, or a parent or sibling or aunt or summer boarder, you could read this book in partnership, each of you taking one of the short sections, reading it, then sorting it into its appropriate pile I ve Read But He Hasn t, He s Read But I Haven t, We ve Both Read, Neither Of Us Has Read This might be a fun game, and a unique kind of bonding experience.Unfortunately, since I live alone, having a book in a box, the sections of which can be read in whichever order one chooses, wasn t all that interesting, except that each time I drew one of the slim sections from out the pile of slim sections, I felt a little like a volunteer at a magic show, drawing a card that might later appear in the magician s pocket, or on the sole of his shoe, or inside the stomach of a rabbit drawn out of a top hat.The conceit of the book is kind of neat, I suppose, and I understand it on an intellectual level the writer, while covering an out of town soccer match for a daily newspaper, realizes he s been to this town before, with a friend of his who died of cancer, and so the random order of each little section represents the random spray of memories, of episodes, that occur to the writer as he thinks about, and misses, his friend.All well and good, though I might point out that those memories did, in fact, occur to the writer in some particular order, and perhaps there is, or could be, a significance to that order Also, if the book were put into order, I m not sure anything would be lost, really, except the book s cute little narrative trick, and its unusual packaging.Though I also feel as though I might change my mind about this later.As for the prose itself, it seems that it s meant to mimic the actual pattern of the writer s thoughts, which is to say there are stops and starts, quick changes in direction, clarifications, everything separated by commas and sometimes odd line spacings that one of my poet friends might be able to explain to me Sometimes this style was great, sometimes it grated.Oddly, I thought the best moments of the story were when the writer was pining over his lost love, Wendy these moments hadnarrative heat, it seemed,yearning, than the farfrequent moments of mourning for his dead friend.So, I m still not entirely sure what to think about this book, and since I have to pick a number, I ll go with 3 stars, rounded up from 2.5, though maybe in a few days, or a week, I ll have an a ha moment and suddenly recognize the book s genius


  9. Jasmine Jasmine says:

    Okay this was a book I should have read a long time ago, and I finally read the content is 4 stars the structure is 3 stars lets talk form first I respect the avant garde thing of splitting up the book However, content wise the book has two pieces memory and present The memories are these cool intermixed first fianc e wife and his friend dying and the association of the two, also memories of his first 2 novels In comparison with present day Ginnie, being a reporter and his son this all w Okay this was a book I should have read a long time ago, and I finally read the content is 4 stars the structure is 3 stars lets talk form first I respect the avant garde thing of splitting up the book However, content wise the book has two pieces memory and present The memories are these cool intermixed first fianc e wife and his friend dying and the association of the two, also memories of his first 2 novels In comparison with present day Ginnie, being a reporter and his son this all works really well, except that the form messes up the present day content that has an obvious order The memories are great mixed up, however the present memories need to be structured My solution make a book that is in order and memories that are then inserted into the book


  10. Michael Michael says:

    211212 first impression this in an interesting structure devised to express the time of mourning a friend, a woman, a past, and in its deliberate renditions of vignettes of memories, in its conversational narration, certainly captures evocative recall but, unfortunately, this is a work that leads me to thinkthan leads me to feelon reflection to think is not a bad thing, in fact, i like to think perhaps i will reflect and thus increase my rating, however this is a big perhaps i may 211212 first impression this in an interesting structure devised to express the time of mourning a friend, a woman, a past, and in its deliberate renditions of vignettes of memories, in its conversational narration, certainly captures evocative recall but, unfortunately, this is a work that leads me to thinkthan leads me to feelon reflection to think is not a bad thing, in fact, i like to think perhaps i will reflect and thus increase my rating, however this is a big perhaps i may read another of his works or lit crit on this one, but much as i like experimental writing, i am not as immediately engaged as when i first read In the Labyrinth by Alain Robbe Grillet, however, i am not as immediately repelled as with Molloy, Malone Dies, The Unnamable A Trilogy by Samuel Becketti think of other experimental works, such as The Mezzanine by Nicholson Baker, which makes much of brief meditation, or the short work by Alice Munro, such as any of her Selected Stories, which makes novelistic complexity and dense multiplicity in so very few words this seems almost in reverse making a novel into a short story for there is deliberately no topography, maze, pattern of any sort, unless it in the designed randomness of the twenty five chapters after first and before lasti think is this story truly independent of some narrative direction is this randomnessthan gimmick and showing something we readers could not discover in any other form i think of work like The Celebration by Ivan Angelo, where the story must be created by the reader out of a mass of documents, or anything by Jos Saramago, such as The Elephant s Journey, where you the reader are called upon to punctuate and in this simple responsibility find yourself collaborating on the worki think does this form simply alienate the reader bore her frustrate her or through this banal plot argue for the reality that we readers as we persons in ordinary life, only discover or manifest or invent meaning of any banal plot after the fact that things happen and who knows where they lead, only sensed as important or revelatory through memory that indeed life makes sense backwards but we must live it forwards i think if i read it again after the shuffling will i find a new story or meaning or have i got the idea and is once enough is this proof that we can never create truly abstract or conceptual literature because there is only the medium of words so the writing is always already the concept i think do i have a naive or instrumental idea of fiction in my case, perhaps unfortunately, only prose believing that before anything else it should be a pleasure and not a chore to read and or i just have not read the right books argue with this idea, i will listen, but my own pleasure always already comes firsti think yes this book in a box certainly raises many questions, but in this case questions that are a pleasure to contemplate to fully appreciate this novel is to recalibrate what usual readers value in lit this is prestige literature this is not plot, not setting, not theme or characters, independent of how it is told, the ceaseless conversation within the narrator s head, the monologue that is not edited or organized, that has perhaps found its correct form in randomnessperhaps.i think if this is only any such novel in first person thought, i much prefer How Late It Was, How Late by James Kelman