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Sticky Buns Across America Is The Story Of One Of The Four Continents And One Of The Countries Woodland Has Crossed By Bike, This Time With Patient Wife Steph A Tale Of Riding Across Small Town America And Occasional Bits Of Canada, Although To Americans That Doesn T Count It S Not A Tale Of Heroic Battling With Storms, Riots, Poison Ivy, Americans, And Other Problems Instead, Sit Back And Enjoy An Eccentric Account Of Encounters Made And Experiences Lived Plus, It Has To Be Admitted, A Lot Of Sticky Buns Eaten About The Author Leo Woodland Is A Tall And Balding Man Who Has Long Annoyed Many By Not Sitting Still Or, Indeed, Pleased Even By Not Staying In One Place For Too Long So Far The Tally By Bike Is Countries On Four Continents Mr Woodland Has Been Writing About Cycling Since , When He Wrote His First Reports For The British Publication Cycling Since Then He Has Been A Prolific Contributor To Newspapers, Magazines, And Radio Stations In The UK, The US And Belgium Many Of His Fans Know Him Better As Les Woodland Sticky Buns Across America Is Mr Woodland S Th Book


7 thoughts on “Sticky Buns Across America: Back-Roads Biking from Sea to Shining Sea

  1. David V. Daw David V. Daw says:

    I am a really big fan of armchair cycling and have a large library containing accounts of many two wheeled journeys This book is an enjoyable read that I found hard to put down It is far than a dull account of the mechanics of a cycle trip and it is full of absorbing vignettes on America and its inhabitants.The author is amusing, erudite, and writes in a very informal, humorous style It is a very successful attempt to catalogue the real joys of cycle touring the meeting of generous, hospitable folk who are eager to share their love of their homeland.Buy it even if you are not a cyclist it could inspire you to copy the author.


  2. T L Price T L Price says:

    slow and poor


  3. Raymond Riha Raymond Riha says:

    Now here s a book worth reading If you enjoy bicycle touring for the adventure with a twist of history and personal accounts of the locals encountered, than you ll enjoy this book Each town or city Leo and his wife pass through or stop over for the night, has a history, whether it s about times long past or that not too distant down the road Leo has a knack for taking interests in these stops and putting it down on paper.Get a copy of his book, sit down, pour yourself a cup of tea or coffee along with a sticky bun and ride with the Woodlands.Ray


  4. Photoangler Photoangler says:

    This book is not at all a how to, in fact Leo hardly mentions equipment or technique In fact, in many ways it isn t really about bike touring, it is about his impressions and experiences while riding across the USA and bits of Canada , the places and the people Not all of his impressions are favorable but they are interesting and give us Americans a look at ourselves we don t often see.A really great read whether you are a bike tourer or not.


  5. Dan Mc Dan Mc says:

    I like long distance cycling travelogues I ride about 6,000 miles a year in 20 40 mile circles near home, but haven t yet traveled by bike though I would like to someday I ve read some of Leo Woodland s race coverage and find the style informative, sometimes interesting, and often merely bearable.I expected of the same but this book was marred by the constant drip, drip, drip of Americans are fat, Americans are dumb, Americans aren t sophisticated Euro snobbery.Yeah, got it I speak and read French fluently and get the French thing, but Leo s taking it to a whole new level It s almost as if Leo and his wife couldn t help it People were too nice, a fellow cyclist too fit, Fourth of July flag waving Americans too patriotic it seemed no one quite meets Leo Woodland s standard except, perhaps, Leo Even the Bible doesn t quite meet Leo s high standards a quip about The Wages of sin is death being grammatically incorrect exposes Leo s myopic understanding of grammar.While there were certainly sections of prose that were pleasing enough to keep me reading, reading this book was like spending time with a friend who is nice but just can t shut up about himself you want to like him, but he keeps getting in the way.There is also precious little information that is usable for a long distance cyclist planning a trip The towns mentioned are often hundreds of miles apart and huge swaths of the journey are bypassed I know that isn t the intent of this book and so can t fault it for that, but be forewarned if you re reading it to help prepare.While Leo provides a wrap up paragraph at the end of the book, I can t help but wonder if he ever had fun on this trip or merely endured it as an assignment.


  6. TFarris TFarris says:

    I ve been a big fan of Les books and his writings for many years When he and his wife took off on searching for the best Sticky Bun in America, I followed his blog he kept up throughout the ride We corresponded a little bit when they were riding near my birthplace about 20 miles from Dyersville, IA At the time, I didn t know he was going to write a book about the adventure but I m glad he did Their stories were not just about riding their bikes across America from East to West It was an honest observation from two Europeans about all the good and not so good things they encountered about this great country we live in I liked how Les would compare some of our rich traditions to their home country of France and England where he grew up For instance, every day throughout the trip, they counted the number of American flags they saw Let s just say they saw a lot of them He was quite impressed with the strong pride this country has of their serviceman Les has a wonderful way of conveying to the reader exactly how it was in all the small towns, Indian reservations and some large cities they travelled through I really liked how he researched and wrote of the history of some of the places they travelled Les and his wife did this ride in the middle of one of the worst economic downturns this country has experienced As a fellow cyclist, I ve seen so many small towns in the Midwest over the past 5 10 years that are literally shutting down due to the poor economy It s very sad to see this happening But he also showed that Americans are really very kind and willing to help out in times of need Thanks Les for writing this wonderful book


  7. matt from philly matt from philly says:

    Overall, this was a fun book The overall story was interesting and kept my interest On than one occasion, however, it as clear that the author a Frenchman didn t ask or didn t understand what he claimed was so strange funny about the US Maybe it was just easier to ignore the explanation For example, he marvels at all of the no trespassing signs he finds along the way He feels that Americans are obsessed with their property rights True or not and I agree, they are ugly if he bothered to ask, he would have learned that if the signs are missing, the trespasser then may trespass or hunt if a no hunting sign is missing It s the price of freedom to put the burden on the landholder and not the traveler.For the price, a good light read.