Prime Taking Charge of ADHD: The Complete, Authoritative Guide for ParentsAuthor Russell A. Barkley – Bilb-weil.de

A treasured parent resource since its publication, Taking Charge of ADHD provides authoritative information on ADHD and its treatment From internationally renowned ADHD expert Russell A Barkley, the book empowers parents by arming them with the knowledge, expert guidance, and confidence they need Included are A step by step plan for behavior management that has helped thousands of children Current information on medications, including coverage of Strattera and extended release stimulants Strategies that help children succeed at school and in social situations Advances in research on the causes of ADHD Practical advice on managing stress and keeping peace in the family Descriptions of books, organizations, and Internet resources that families can trust


10 thoughts on “Taking Charge of ADHD: The Complete, Authoritative Guide for Parents

  1. Michele Michele says:

    I wish I had read this three years ago This has become an invaluable resource for me in getting a gameplan together to manage my son s ADHD I recommend this for anyone with a child who has trouble in the classroom It doesn t touch on any learning disabilities, but gives plenty of arrows to point you in the right direction.


  2. Jill Jill says:

    Hm Don t know where to start on this one Some chapters were certainly worth it Others were very clinical and scary Lots of statistics to make it Loud and Clear what kids and parents are up against It was a good cautionary tale in some respects, validations about some of the things I m already doing in other respectsand some good basic medical information But, as a good friend reminded me recently, this isn t the book that is going to give me hope This book will give me facts and truths Hm Don t know where to start on this one Some chapters were certainly worth it Others were very clinical and scary Lots of statistics to make it Loud and Clear what kids and parents are up against It was a good cautionary tale in some respects, validations about some of the things I m already doing in other respectsand some good basic medical information But, as a good friend reminded me recently, this isn t the book that is going to give me hope This book will give me facts and truths The hope I must find from the heart of my boy and my faith


  3. Laura Laura says:

    Disclaimer This is probablya rant about my son s ADHD than a review You ve been warned Not too long ago, while reading a description of Fetal Alcohol Syndrome, I was struck by its similarities to my child Having been around for 100% of his fetal development, I know I ingested nothing worse than Ramen Noodles, but the similarities led me to the suspicion that my son sconcerning behaviors and traits are related to some type of early brain damage This took me down a rabbit hole tha Disclaimer This is probablya rant about my son s ADHD than a review You ve been warned Not too long ago, while reading a description of Fetal Alcohol Syndrome, I was struck by its similarities to my child Having been around for 100% of his fetal development, I know I ingested nothing worse than Ramen Noodles, but the similarities led me to the suspicion that my son sconcerning behaviors and traits are related to some type of early brain damage This took me down a rabbit hole that led me back to his diagnosis of ADHD from 3 4 years ago, which then led me to this book I don t know why the pediatrician who diagnosed him didn t explain that there is so muchto ADHD than inattentiveness I hadn t realized how valid Blame It on My ADD could be This book explained so much about my son s behavior, so many aha moments It was like watching the end of Sixth Sense and reframing all those scenes in light of the big reveal Some of the bigger ahas Pre natal developmental problems are linked to ADHD I have a pet theory about mold in the chronically flooded basement I lived in while pregnant, but this is not one of the known factors listed in the book What I do know is that my baby was so small en utero that the doctor decided I must have been confused about my dates and pushed out the due date a full month which made no sense because that meant I wasn t pregnant when I took my first positive pregnancy test, but hey, I m no doctor Lo and behold, my son was born early and very small Temperament in infancy and early childhood is connected to ADHD People would tell me my colicky baby had to be in pain to cry so much, but I secretly wondered if he was just bored He could never get enough stimulation I became a human Disneyland ride, bouncing and pacing and swinging simultaneously to keep him happy The study about ADHD children playing with each toy for less time really hit home As a toddler through NOW , he couldn t can t entertain himself for long I remember one particular weekend rushing him from one activity to the next the zoo, the park, several playdates, andand coming home exhausted only to find my 5 year old couldn t entertain himself for even the one unstructured hour of the day Still waiting for that selective hyper focus everyone talks about ADHD ers having to kick in Deficiencies in fine motor skills are linked to ADHD Around age 4, he was concerned about who would spoon feed him when his baby brother needed the same service When he was starting kindergarten, I remember trying to explain to a teacher that he couldn t put on his own jacket She kept thinking I meant he couldn t zip it, but he literally could not put it on Another teacher warned me he would fail kindergarten if he couldn t formlegible letters We moved, so I never found out if he progressed enough to pass that school district s standards More than an attention problem, ADHD is an issue with self regulation and executive function I think the book uses the term self inhibition, but it madesense for me to think of it as self control I truly believe my son wants to be good but has cognitive deficiencies that make carrying out that resolve difficult I remember his pre school self staring wistfully at a mall Santa and saying, Santa won t bring me anything I m not good ADHD brains have difficulty processing long term consequences Only days before I read this, my son had tried to explain, when asked why he did X when he knew the consequence would be Y, I m not a future person I m a now person He wasn t presenting it as an excuse, just an explanation I don t know if I m mixing up this book with other studies I ve read, but I guess ADHD brains don t get much, if any, of a chemical rush of pleasure from anticipating a reward, making itdifficult to work towards that reward This explains why all his sticker charts remained empty growing up I assume it works the same way in reverse, where he doesn t get the same reaction to anticipated negative consequences as everyone else does ADHD is one ginormous sleep problem I d already learned that ADHD and sleep problems are connected, but this book further explained that those with ADHD movephysically during sleep as well as during the day, and they don t have the same structured circadian rhythms as others I ve read elsewhere that when sleep problems are solved, ADHD symptoms go away entirely But since ADHD causes the sleep problems to begin with ADHD is a disability I remember trying to explain to a therapist that our son was high maintenance and required a lot of energy from me The therapist interpreted this as him having special needs, and I corrected her, but maybe that wasn t the wrong way to put it However, the author is firm that this particular disability requires MORE accountability of the disabled, not less, in order to mitigate the disability ADHD is linked to Oppositional Defiance Order My son doesn t have an ODD diagnosis, but that would explain A LOT.One thing the author did well was make me, the parent, feel validated I ve gotten so burned out on parenting books, with their condescending assurance that you were doing everything ridiculously wrong until you found this book I was whining to my sister about this when she said, Maybe all the normal parenting books don t work because you aren t parenting a normal child Mind blown If this can be called a parenting book, it s not a normal one, thank goodness The author reassures us that we aren t bad parents One study is cited to show that the differences between parents of ADHD children and others is probably a reaction to the child, not a cause The author walks a fine line between not blaming parents and showing it s still within the parents power to make it better It was sobering to hear that the big distinguishing factor between whether difficult toddlers are later diagnosed with ADHD is the primary caregiver He even understands that parents have their own crap to deal with, with ADHD parents beinglikely to have depression and anxiety and even ADHD themselves, something that normal parenting books never seem to grasp When the author expresses understanding of how exhausting parenting an ADHD child isstrumming my pain with his fingers He notes that parents of ADHD children have the same stress levels as parents of children with severe developmental disabilities And I thought I was just a wuss He even includes a chapter on how to take care of yourself as a parent, with the takeaway that your child doesn t need you to be a martyr A lot of the parenting suggestions in the book rang true to me, such as Reward and punish immediately so they caneasily connect their behavior with its consequence I think of this as treating them like Pavlov s dogs Lecture sparingly The kid probably isn t listening anyway If you have to lecture, keep it short and sweet Never issue a command without enforcing it So think carefully before issuing a command Focus on one behavior at a time Decide what the biggest problem is and work on that I don t know why I never gave myself permission to do this, but it s very freeing to think I don t have to address every problem at once Don t expect perfect grades, or homework perfectly completed I already resigned myself to Bs, but I was still insistent that homework be perfect because it was done on my watch Like several parents in the book, I ve let homework impair our relationship Grades are definitely not the biggest problem we should be working on, and if I ve learned anything from parenting it s that I need to save my strength for the battles that actually matter.On the other hand, the suggestions for dealing with schools seem like helicopter parenting to me Teachers do not get paid enough to do give as much individualized attention to my child as the author thinks parents should demand However, that s my perspective as the parent of a kid who s bright enough or at least at the older end of his class enough to eek by despite his ADHD albeit below his potential , and maybe I d feel differently if he wasn t doing so okay It s probably useful for students who already have IEPs, and maybe I ll revisit that chapter if we ever get to that point I m also a bit skeptical about reward programs, having set up and discarded many over the years The nature of ADHD, as the author explained, requires bigger than usual rewards, so even small rewards have to be relatively large I was pleasantly surprised when I realized he could be bribed, at 5, to not fight with his little brother for 24 hours in exchange for the backpack he wanted for school But I don t feel I should buy him a 10 something for every day he doesn t hit his brother, and giving him tokens e.g., sticker charts, money to work up to a bigger reward has almost never worked with him Further, often when I ve offered him a reward and he doesn t earn it, he s thrown a tantrum about not being given the reward anyway, so I m stuck with even worse behavior than I started with I m not sure how to apply a reward system in conjunction with other science that suggests too many rewards and even praise can backfire into entitlement and a lack of motivation to perform without an arbitrary extrinsic reward I don t want to raise a Naomi Campbell I don t get out of bed for less than 10,000 a day As other reviewers have noted, there is certainly a bleak, almost hopeless tone to the book I d been taking comfort that kids grow out of it, as evidenced by their frontal lobes developing into normal size by adulthood, but the author shatters this by observing that an increase in size is not necessarily an increase in grey matter And sure, 50% of kids grow out of ADHD by adulthood, but according to the author only 10% of kids DON T have a some sort of mental disorder depression, ADHD, anti social, etc in adulthood But it s what I needed realistic explanations and expectations, not empty platitudes or promises about what a wonderful gift ADHD is if only it were understood Maybe I ll want to read that type of book later, but right now I want to know what I m up against It s helped to remind myself, when hearing that ADHD teens are however manytimes likely to crash a car or get someone pregnant, that 4 times a very small percentage is still a small percentage Side note I thought it was a little hypocritical of the author to scare us about how muchlikely our child is to do all manner of shenanigans, then later lecture us not to catastrophize about our teen doing those shenanigans I would have liked to seeoptimism about neurofeedback and neuroplasticity in general, with evaluations of the effectiveness of exercises for developing white and grey matter in the prefrontal lobe e.g, piano, brain games, Brain Balance , but I realize this book was written a while ago I d love to see an updated version


  4. Kris Kipp Kris Kipp says:

    I found this book to be both informative and insightful However, in my opinion, it also reads like a textbook and was at times a bit of a chore to get through.


  5. Shel Shel says:

    I haven t read every page yet but this has been an invaluable resource in helping me understand the best way to parent my son.


  6. Anne Jordan-Baker Anne Jordan-Baker says:

    Best book that I ve read on this topic Recent science, excellent advice One downside for me less attention ha to inattentive type than to hyperactive and combined types Barkley is a blunt guy, calling the myths about ADHD fallacies and those holding them to be scientifically illiterate This is also the first book I ve read that addresses the true seriousness of ADHD, that even the term ADHD which he thinks should be changed trivializes the disorder, since it grossly understates th Best book that I ve read on this topic Recent science, excellent advice One downside for me less attention ha to inattentive type than to hyperactive and combined types Barkley is a blunt guy, calling the myths about ADHD fallacies and those holding them to be scientifically illiterate This is also the first book I ve read that addresses the true seriousness of ADHD, that even the term ADHD which he thinks should be changed trivializes the disorder, since it grossly understates the substantial and dramatic problems it can cause Kind of a bummer to read cuz ADHD ain t pretty, but I do prefer facts to fallacies, so I recommend it


  7. Katie Katie says:

    Although there are some good chapters in this book, I found that the author assumed all children with ADHD had oppositional defiance disorder ODD and a large portion of this book was dedicated to behavior modification and increasing compliance This book sets out to educate parents about ADHD, but it seems a bit misinformed about all aspects of the disorder I did appreciate the chapters on how the medications work, and all the options available.


  8. Kyla Kyla says:

    I didn t like that they stuck fast to commonly used medical terms, like minimal brain dysfunction and ADHD even though not all cases of ADD include Hyperactivity, however I was extremely grateful for the medical explanations of what causes the inattention and for the many tips on how to use positive reinforcement to encourage attention and proper behavior.


  9. Summer B. Summer B. says:

    This is the bible of ADHD resources I appreciate how thorough it is, and how the author cites references and dates for every study, fact, or statistic If you have a child with ADHD, this is a must read, must highlight, must memorize passages There is a third edition out, and I highly recommend getting the most recent edition, as ADHD research is advancing all the time


  10. Becky Becky says:

    This book was great Our daughter has been having issues and she s being evaluated for ADHD later this month We ve struggled with how to connect with her and help her with learning issues While the book does talk about some scary statistics, it also showed me that our daughter s behavior isn t as severe as we had thought After reading the book, I found that a lot of the methods we already had in place are what they recommend so that was good We ve also done all the right things so far what This book was great Our daughter has been having issues and she s being evaluated for ADHD later this month We ve struggled with how to connect with her and help her with learning issues While the book does talk about some scary statistics, it also showed me that our daughter s behavior isn t as severe as we had thought After reading the book, I found that a lot of the methods we already had in place are what they recommend so that was good We ve also done all the right things so far what a relief though it did cover what we can do as far as when she starts kindergarten next year, so that was really helpful I just didn t know much about the disability, and honestly thought it was somewhat made up until we began experiencing it with her This book cleared up a lot of things for me, such as the fact that children with ADHD have brains that are physically different from other children, and how much the criticism received from parents teachers classmates can affect them We have been extremely fortunate to have a teacher who has been very willing to work with her and us, along with a speech and OT therapist who have helped significantly too It also eased my mind significantly about medication Overall, I just didn t understand the disability very well and this cleared up a lot of misconceptions I had