read online Best The Long Way By Bernard Moitessier – Bilb-weil.de

Funny that I had not read this book previously My brother asked me to read something at his wedding that was nautical and talked about life, this was his first thought for inspiration.Moitessier conveys his love for the sea and sailing Central to the book is what it means to be a creature living on this planet This is the story of a solitary voyage, racing around the planet in a small boat The other competitors are nearly absent What is present is the sea, the boat, Moitessier, and his thou Funny that I had not read this book previously My brother asked me to read something at his wedding that was nautical and talked about life, this was his first thought for inspiration.Moitessier conveys his love for the sea and sailing Central to the book is what it means to be a creature living on this planet This is the story of a solitary voyage, racing around the planet in a small boat The other competitors are nearly absent What is present is the sea, the boat, Moitessier, and his thoughts and memories.The author talks to us about the experience of being alone out on the water and how it causes him to reflect on his relationships with other people and with society He claims space for the vagabond who lives outside of the monster that society has become.Perfect book for me I m shopping for boats The Long Way is Bernard Moitessier s own incredible story of his participation in the first Golden Globe Race, a solo, non stop circumnavigation rounding the three great Capes of Good Hope, Leeuwin, and the Horn For seven months, the veteran seafarer battled storms, doldrums, gear failures, knock downs, as well as overwhelming fatigue and loneliness Then, nearing the finish, Moitessier pulled out of the race and sailed on for another three months before ending his , mile journey in Tahiti Not once had he touched land I came to this book after reading A Voyage for Madmen I was just fascinated to learnabout someone who sails alone around the world, without touching land and when almost home decides Nah Let s just keep sailing.The book doesn t disappoint but here is a man so obsessed he must have been impossible to live with I have seen film of an interview with his wife and she says I m paraphrasing here That s Bernard It s just the way he is and you have to accept that Strikes me that she is I came to this book after reading A Voyage for Madmen I was just fascinated to learnabout someone who sails alone around the world, without touching land and when almost home decides Nah Let s just keep sailing.The book doesn t disappoint but here is a man so obsessed he must have been impossible to live with I have seen film of an interview with his wife and she says I m paraphrasing here That s Bernard It s just the way he is and you have to accept that Strikes me that she is just as remarkable a woman as he is a man I wanted to like this, but ultimately it wasn t for me The first half was a pretty standard sea tale consisting of weather updates, sea conditions, etc your basic log entry stuff peppered in over a lot of talk about the freedom of the sea and the sort of vague spirituality that engenders Not bad There were a few choice quotes and moments of rumination But the second half really went off the hippy dippy deep end There was a lot of talk about the Monster, which, as best as I can figure, is I wanted to like this, but ultimately it wasn t for me The first half was a pretty standard sea tale consisting of weather updates, sea conditions, etc your basic log entry stuff peppered in over a lot of talk about the freedom of the sea and the sort of vague spirituality that engenders Not bad There were a few choice quotes and moments of rumination But the second half really went off the hippy dippy deep end There was a lot of talk about the Monster, which, as best as I can figure, is the personification of humanity s avarice There s a fine line between working with technology say embracing a boat designed to harness the wind for the express purpose of allowing a yachtsman to circumnavigate the globe single handedly and decrying technology s ability to divorce mankind from nature Moitessier chooses instead to approach the subject in blunt terms At one point he goes on this long rant at least I think he was talking about himself I wasn t paying too much attention by then about how he s going to donate all the proceeds from the book to the Pope, so the Pope can use it to safeguard the Earth from this Monster I pretty much gave up reading at that point, but since I was close to the end, I figured why not hate read this to the end.If you re looking for warmed over hippie philosophy with a salty flavor, this is for you If not, avoid it like so many shoals for a deep keeled boat.If you liked this, make sure to follow me on Goodreads forreviews In 1968 the London Sunday Times sponsored a circumnavigating the globe single handed sailing race At that time, no one had sailed around the world alone without stopping With the media attention there was evenof the romanticism always intwined in The Sea The race, however, would come to expose all the real and terrible tragedy of nature Alone in that empty, mystical plain of ungovernable, unfathomable wild, one man would step off his boat s deck sinking forever into the oblivion Moi In 1968 the London Sunday Times sponsored a circumnavigating the globe single handed sailing race At that time, no one had sailed around the world alone without stopping With the media attention there was evenof the romanticism always intwined in The Sea The race, however, would come to expose all the real and terrible tragedy of nature Alone in that empty, mystical plain of ungovernable, unfathomable wild, one man would step off his boat s deck sinking forever into the oblivion Moitessier, leading at the time, elected to turn his boat around and just keep going Winning was really and truly not the point The second half of the twentieth century had no shortage of false mystics touting philosophies and lifestyles they knew nothing about Moitessier was real and knew what the fuck he was talking about So muchthan a book about participating in a famous sailing race This is an amazing meditation on how to live in harmony with our beautiful planet, written by someone who sawof it than most Don t expect rip roaring excitement being so calm means he makes the impossible sound easy but do expect to be haunted by his words Haunted in a good way and haunted in a bad way The environmental message of this book has never beenimportant.Don t worry if you are not a sailor as there So muchthan a book about participating in a famous sailing race This is an amazing meditation on how to live in harmony with our beautiful planet, written by someone who sawof it than most Don t expect rip roaring excitement being so calm means he makes the impossible sound easy but do expect to be haunted by his words Haunted in a good way and haunted in a bad way The environmental message of this book has never beenimportant.Don t worry if you are not a sailor as there is an excellent glossary of sailing terms at the back of the book In 1968, the Sunday Times of the UK held the first and only Golden Globe race sailors had to single handedly circumnavigate the globe in a sailboat race with the sailboat staying within certain specifications The race began and ended in Plymouth, UK No fancy navigational aids were allowed there was no GPS then in any case , no radio, nothing To mark the 50th anniversary of that race, another will be held beginning in the summer of 2018 This is an appropriate time to read or revisit Bernar In 1968, the Sunday Times of the UK held the first and only Golden Globe race sailors had to single handedly circumnavigate the globe in a sailboat race with the sailboat staying within certain specifications The race began and ended in Plymouth, UK No fancy navigational aids were allowed there was no GPS then in any case , no radio, nothing To mark the 50th anniversary of that race, another will be held beginning in the summer of 2018 This is an appropriate time to read or revisit Bernard Moitessier s book, The Long Way, describing his own experience in that race.Moitessier was already an experienced sailor and well known in the sailing world and had friends who were also participating in the race Moitessier had a 39 steel ketch, Joshua, named after Joshua Slocum who was the world s first solo circumnavigator I believe Joshua was 10 years old when Moitessier started from Plymouth on August 22, 1968 We are privy to all that goes through the solo sailor s mind and all that happens to his boat on this voyage Moitessier went around the Cape of Good Hope South Africa in October 1968, crossed Cape Leeuwin Australia in early December 1968 and Cape Horn Chile in February 1969 In March 1969 he reached a point off the south western coast of Africa where he had previously been During this time, he encountered numerous challenges including several gales and his boat being knocked down twice the main mast hitting the water due to a large wave hitting the boat broadsides However, he also encountered many beautiful sights on the open ocean fish, birds, the stars, the moon, and just the water.After crossing Cape Horn, and navigating much of the Atlantic Ocean to reach the point off the south western coast of Africa, Moitessier is mentally and physically exhausted This is when things get a bit weird For about 8 months, he has had virtually no contact with humans except for handing off a couple of messages to passing fishermen We know right from the introductory chapter that he has a loving wife and children waiting for him back in Plymouth The right thing for him to do would be to head north and make for the Ascension Islands, then onto Europe and Plymouth so he can complete the race and be reunited with his family Here s a passage that describes his thoughts at that time Saint Helena is 1300 miles away Just looking at the chart, I can feel all the gentleness of the trade wind in the cabin It caresses me, so soft, so good I look a bit further north Ascension Island, 1700 miles, almost on the direct route In that case, better make it Ascension If I can work things out with the heavens to catch the trades without delay, I should make Ascension in two weeks at the outside, sleeping twenty hours a day if I feel like it Two weeks What a relief for all my loved ones And for me I feel good now that a decision has been taken that is reasonable for all concerned Then on the next page, I have set course for the Pacific againlast night was too hard to take, I felt really sick at the thought of getting back to Europe, back to the snakepit If you want to be present when someone sane turns insane read this part of the book Particularly if you speak and read French because Moitessier being French himself has reproduced his original diary in French in this book The English translation is good, but I m assuming it can t beat the original.Moitessier actually skipped Europe and rounded Cape of Good Hope again, Cape Leeuwin again and ended up in Tahiti To barely understand what led him to do this, read this book So, officially he never did finish the race Only one person who started the race actually finished it and he has become a hero to all aspiring sailors Robin Knox Johnson Some of the others who started have their own stories of course, and one, Daniel Crowhurst, became mentally ill and committed suicide This is obviously a fascinating race and the 50th anniversary and the re running of the race appears to be a promising and interesting event to look forward to If you choose to follow the race as it unfolds in 2018, do read this book to get some context it will make your journey all thericher This book gave me a lot of courage to try out things on my own for it isn t always easy to get others to subscribe to your dreams As a storybook, it s just mediocre because there isn t much high drama here of the type one expects in a novel But for sailorsa must read First published in 1973, if The Long Way is dated, it s in a melancholy way The book ends after Moitessier s circumnavigation andwith the wise sailor encountering environmental destruction on Tahiti He becomes engaged, politicized, after months of selfish in a good way voyaging Just him, the Joshua his boat, the porpoises, the sea robins, the sky, sea, sun and moon But you can t help but feel, if we could dial the planet back to the state it was in in 1973, we would be a long way First published in 1973, if The Long Way is dated, it s in a melancholy way The book ends after Moitessier s circumnavigation andwith the wise sailor encountering environmental destruction on Tahiti He becomes engaged, politicized, after months of selfish in a good way voyaging Just him, the Joshua his boat, the porpoises, the sea robins, the sky, sea, sun and moon But you can t help but feel, if we could dial the planet back to the state it was in in 1973, we would be a long way towards some kind of eco sanity Not perfect, but nowhere near the point we are now.Some moments in The Long Way jar painfully Moitessier s departure from his wife and children His avoidance of them throughout his time away Also, the amount of stuff he chucks over the side of the boat to save weight He does not have a contemporary sensibility He gleefully smokes his way around the world He is not a saint But he s on a genuine quest for something Hence his famous message to the Sunday Times Dear Robert The Horn was rounded February 5, and today is March 18 I am continuing non stop towards the Pacific Islands because I am happy at sea, and perhaps also to save my soul This is a forerunner of Bruce Chatwin s invented telegram to his editor Have gone to Patagonia The Long Way is one of the great books about the satisfactions of isolated dedication to a task It is full of contradictions Moitessier is both at rest but also involved in a gung ho race against other solo sailors but also against the seasons Moitessier is a yoga performing hippie sympathiser, but he s also a very old kind of macho.I re read this, listening to Dave Crosby s The Lee Shore in a fairly obsessive way If you re a city dweller who wants to run away to sea, that combination is the best I can offer.And if you re engaged on any long project for example, writing a novel or recovering from an illness , Moitessier is a great companion to have in your solitude One thing at a time, as in the days when I was building Joshua If I had wanted to build all the boat at once, the enormity of the task would have crushed me I had to put all I had into the hull alone, without thinking about the rest It would follow with the help of the Gods Sailing non stop around the world I do not think anyone has the means of pulling it off at the start This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers To view it, click here I really enjoyed the early parts of this book and the appendix which focus on his trip famous trip a time and a half around the world There was a nice balance between the technical aspects of sailing and the psychological adventure of the long voyage.However, he really lost me around the time he made his decision to keep going around Good Hope for a second time He presents his decision as how could I not and I know I have to keep going but without any compelling internal or external reason I really enjoyed the early parts of this book and the appendix which focus on his trip famous trip a time and a half around the world There was a nice balance between the technical aspects of sailing and the psychological adventure of the long voyage.However, he really lost me around the time he made his decision to keep going around Good Hope for a second time He presents his decision as how could I not and I know I have to keep going but without any compelling internal or external reason I found myself put off by the profound self absorption with which he assured us and himself that his wife and children would understand that he needed to go to Tahiti instead of home to them.The last part of the narrative was pretty disjointed and trippy, talking to birds, ceding his royalties to the Pope, raging against The Monster The last chapters read muchlike a hippie his word manifesto than a sailing memoir.I read this because I was curious about the man and his voyage after reading A Voyage for Madmen I don t regret the read, but in terms of sailing memoirs, Josh Sloacum s Sailing Alone around the World is a lotsatisfying This is an interesting story though other stories about the Golden Globe Race should be read first Moitessier writes well, and with detail When reading, I felt that he did not sufficiently explain his decision to keep going but this is addressed in the last chapters Caught unawares, a flying fish shoots straight up in a twenty foot leap into the air A huge barracuda takes off after it and snatches the flying fish at the top of the arc The really amazing thing was seeing the barracuda co This is an interesting story though other stories about the Golden Globe Race should be read first Moitessier writes well, and with detail When reading, I felt that he did not sufficiently explain his decision to keep going but this is addressed in the last chapters Caught unawares, a flying fish shoots straight up in a twenty foot leap into the air A huge barracuda takes off after it and snatches the flying fish at the top of the arc The really amazing thing was seeing the barracuda contorting its entire body and beating its tail, modifying its trajectory to follow the prey, which had angled off to the left at the top of its leap I felt sorry for the little one, but was so struck by the terrible beauty of a master stroke that I let out a big Aaah The stars are twinkling very brightly up there in the night When I was a kid, an old Indochinese fisherman explained to me why the stars twinkle, and why they twinkle very strongly when the wind is going to come back But I can t tell that story tonight, I m too sleepy Joshua passes through groups ofthan a hundred of these very little birds, about the size of robins, with silvery plumage, whose quick turns and sideslips remind me of swallows before a storm Their undersides are white, the tails dark grey, and a big W marks the tops of their wings They zig zag along the water, often putting a leg down as if to help them turn No relation to the tiny black and white petrels, who play in the air as lightly as butterflies They too often turn by pushing a foot against the water I hear familiar whistlings and hurry out, as always when porpoises are around I don t think I ve ever seen so many at once The water is white with their splashing, furrowed in all directions by the knives of their dorsal fins There must be close to a hundred A tight line of 25 porpoises swimming abreast goes from stern to stem on the starboard side, in three breaths, then the whole group veers right and rushes off at right angles, all the fins cutting the water together and in the same breath taken on the fly I watch, wonderstruck More than ten times they repeat the same thing Even if the sun were to return, I could not tear myself away from all this joy, all this life, to get out the Beaulieu I have never seen such a perfect ballet And each time, it is to the right that they rush off, whipping the sea white for thirty yards They are obeying a precise command, that is for sure I can t tell if it is always the same group of 20 or 25, there are too many porpoises to keep track They seem nervous I do not understand The others seem nervous too, splashing along in zig zags, beating the water with their tails, instead of playing with the bow, the way they usually do The entire sea rings with their whistling Something pulls me, something pushes me I look at the compass Joshua is running downwind at 7 knots straight for Stewart Island, hidden in the stratus The steady west wind had shifted around to the south without my realizing it The course change was not apparent because of the quiet sea, without any swell, on which Joshua neither rolled nor tossed Usually, Joshua always lets me know of course changes without my having to look at the compass if the sky is overcast This time, she couldn t There are as many porpoises as before But now they play with Joshua , fanned out ahead, in single file alongside, with the very lithe, very gay movements I have always known And then something wonderful happens a big black and white porpoise jumps ten or twelve feet in the air in a fantastic somersault, with two complete rolls And he lands flat, tail forward Three times he does his double roll, bursting with a tremendous joy, as if he were shouting to me and all the other porpoises The man understood that we were trying to tell him to sail to the right you understood you understood keep on like that, it s all clear ahead My porpoises have been swimming around Joshua for over two hours The ones I have met in the past rarely stayedthan a quarter of an hour before going on their way When they leave, all at once, two of them remain behind until twilight, a total of five full hours They swim as if a little bored, one on the right, the other on the left For three hours longer they swim like that, each isolated on his own side, without playing, setting their speed by Joshua s, two or three yards from the boat I have never seen anything like it Porpoises have never kept me company this long I am sure they were given the order to stay with me until Joshua was absolutely out of danger Plymouth so close, barely 10,000 miles to the north but leaving from Plymouth and returning to Plymouth now seems like leaving from nowhere to go nowhere Lots of people believe that the bulldozer and the concrete mixer don t think They re wrong they do think They think that if they don t have any work to do, they won t earn any money, and then their slaves won t be able to buy the fuel and oil they need to go on living and go on thinking serious thoughts They think human beings are pretty retarded, still making their babies in joy and love and pain Their procreation technique is muchefficient they work flat out without ever getting tired, and that means profits, and their slaves hurry to makebulldozers and concrete mixers which are born fully grown, ready to work without wasting a minute Our nation would not collect gold medals at the Olympics, but the gold medal supermen would listen to our anthem And they would seek citizenship so as not to be superior anyThen the manufacturers of cars, and oil, and super giant planes, and bombs, and generals, and all the rest would gradually begin to feel that the turning has been finally taken, that it is a thousand times truer to have men guided by heart and instinct than the twisted gimmicks of money and politics